Commit bd42e553 authored by Mahé Perrette's avatar Mahé Perrette
Browse files

Klein Goldewijk + pub date

parent df4457ff
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Cape Verde is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Costa Rica is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Cuba is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Cyprus is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Czech Republic is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Germany is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Djibouti is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Denmark is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Dominican Republic is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Algeria is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Ecuador is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Egypt is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Eritrea is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Western Sahara is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Spain is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Estonia is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Ethiopia is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Finland is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Fiji is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
......@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ Affilitations:
3. Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Published: [to be added]
Published: 15 January 2020
Doi: [to be added]
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ The ISIMIP2b simulations start in 1860 (before human greenhouse gas emissions st
As the “land area affected by drought” varies quite strongly from year to year we decided to average numbers over multiple years: for each year we calculate the deviation of the land area affected by droughts from the average reference level without climate change. These deviations are then averaged over a present-day period (2001-2020), a mid-century period (2041-2060) and an end-of-century period (2081-2100). To calculate the changes at different levels of global mean temperature change we do not average over years belonging to one of these periods but over all years with global mean warming levels close to 1°C, 2°C, and 3°C.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
When calculating the “number of people exposed to droughts” we proceed in a similar way. We assume that only the rural population is exposed while the urban population does not necessarily “feel” any drought. For 1860 to 2005 we account for changes in population patterns ([Klein Goldewijk et al., 2017](https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017)). Afterwards the population data is considered constant -- not as a realistic assumption but an informative “thought experiment”: What would future climate change mean for present day societies? For all time periods, the pure effect of climate change on the “number of people exposed to droughts” is estimated by comparing the number of people exposed under climate change and a specific population pattern to the number of people exposed assuming the same population patterns but no climate change.
In the following we describe what we have found and how strongly Falkland Islands is affected compared to other countries.
......@@ -137,7 +137,7 @@ Frieler, K. and Lange, S. and Piontek, F. and Reyer, C. P. O. and Schewe, J. and
Gerten, D. and Betts, R. and Döll, P. (2014). Cross-chapter box on the active role of vegetation in altering water flows under climate change. In: Field CB, Barros VR, Dokken DJ, Mach KJ, Mastrandrea MD, Bilir TE, Chatterjee M, Ebi KL, Estrada YO, Genova RC, Girma B, Kissel ES, Levy AN, MacCracken S, Mastrandrea PR, White LL (eds) Climate Change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the 5th assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 157–161
Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Klein Goldewijk, K., Beusen, A., Doelman, J., Stehfest, E. (2017) Anthropogenic land use estimates for the Holocene – HYDE 3.2. Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 9, 927–953. https://dx.doi.org/10.5194/essd-9-927-2017
Kuzyakov, Y., Horwath, W. R., Dorodnikov, M. and Blagodatskaya, E. (2019). Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes: No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles, Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 128, 66-78, https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005
......
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